Other July News in Brief

02. August 2021

New study from CCG presents the first method for producing artificial mucus; CCQ publishes two new articles in Nature Communications; New interdisciplinary study about bacteria from CeMist; PREDICT awarded grant to improve knowledge of the long-term health consequences of Covid-19; Senior Researcher Oleguer Plana-Ripoll from John McGrath’s Niels Bohr Professorship is awarded grant to research mental illness. All this in the DNRF’s Other July News in Brief here.

New study from CCG presents the first method for producing artificial mucus

The human body is filled with mucus, which is necessary for our overall health. By producing an artificial mucus that resembles the mucus we have in our bodies, researchers will be able to develop new medicine and treatment options for stomach and intestinal flora diseases. The DNRF’s Center of Excellence CCG at the University of Copenhagen has now come out with a new study that presents the first method for producing artificial mucus. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

Read the scientific article in Nature Communications here

You can read more about the new study at the University of Copenhagen here

CCQ publishes two new articles in Nature Communications

The Center of Excellence CCG at Aarhus University has explored how so-called “excited quantum states,” a state of a system that has higher energy than the ground state, can be used to control and exploit strong interactions in semiconductors. The new study has led to two scientific articles in Nature Communications, on which Professor and head of center at CCG Thomas Pohl is co-author.

Read one of the scientific articles in Nature Communications here

Read the other scientific article in Nature Communications here

More information at Aarhus University here

New interdisciplinary study about bacteria from CeMist

In a scientific collaboration between computational biology, microbiology, and chemistry, researchers from the DNRF’s CeMist at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) have found a novel way for bacteria to share the so-called biosynthetic “gene clusters” (BGCs).  The new study has been published in the scientific journal Current Biology. Metabolomics core manager Aaron J.C. Andersen and Ph.D. student Carlos N. Lozano-Andrade from CeMist are co-authors on the study, and Associate Professor Mikael Lenz Strube from CeMist is the last author.

Read the scientific article in Current Biology here

Read more at DTU here

PREDICT awarded grant to improve knowledge of the long-term health consequences of Covid-19

One of the DNRF’s newest Centers of Excellence PREDICT at Aalborg University has been awarded DKK 3,234,000. Head of center and Professor Tine Jess will be at the forefront of this project, which will research the potential long-term health consequences of Covid-19 in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. The grant comes after several reports have indicated that Covid-19 may cause long-term disease. The Novo Nordisk Foundation has awarded a total of six grants to research projects that will look at the long-term health consequences of Covid-19.

More information about PREDICT here

Read more about the six grants here

Senior Researcher Oleguer Plana-Ripoll from John McGrath’s Niels Bohr Professorship is awarded grant to research mental illness

Even though mental illness has a devastating impact on patients in a wide range of areas, there is still a lack of methods to more specifically analyze the implications of mental illness. Senior Researcher Oleguer Plana-Ripoll from John McGrath’s Niels Bohr Professorship has been awarded a Lundbeck Foundation Fellow grant to work on developing new methods to examine these implications.

More information about the DNRF’s John McGrath’s Niels Bohr Professorship here

Read more about the Lundbeck Foundation here