Other August News in Brief

31. August 2020

Professor Mathias Middelboe from the new Center of Excellence HADAL participated in Bloom’s mini festival 2020; the first volume of UrbNet’s new international Journal of Urban Archeology has been published; and CEM’s research in cable bacteria is featured in a special edition of Science. All this in the DNRF’s Other August News in Brief here.

 

Professor Mathias Middelboe from HADAL at Bloom’s mini festival 2020

About two-thirds of the Earth is made up of oceans, and about 80 percent is deeper than two kilometers. Nevertheless, so far only 15 percent has been mapped. These were some of the words from Professor Mathias Middelboe when he participated in “The Deep Sea and Outer Space,” a symposium during Bloom’s mini festival “Weekend Under the Oak” on August 15, 2020. In a dialogue with astrophysicist Anja C. Andersen and geologist Kristoffer Szilas, Middelboe dived into some of the similarities and differences between research from the deepest nooks and crannies of the ocean, the composition of the Earth, and the outer space of the universe based on intersections between biology, geology, and astrophysics.

Middelboe is a deep-sea researcher and professor at one of the DNRF’s ten new Centers of Excellence, the Danish Center for Hadal Research (HADAL) at the University of Southern Denmark. Here they will study the so-called hadal zone, which is the deepest region of the sea, extending from a depth of six to eleven kilometers. The hadal zone is found in deep-sea tombs and is one of the most extreme and inaccessible places on Earth.

Read more about the new Center of Excellence HADAL in a press release from the University of Southern Denmark here

More information about the event at the Bloom Festival can be found (in Danish) here


The first volume of UrbNet’s new international Journal of Urban Archeology has been published

The first volume of the new international Journal of Urban Archeology was recently published. Behind the journal are Professor Rubina Raja and Professor Søren M. Sindbæk from the DNRF Center of Excellence UrbNet at Aarhus University. Both head of center Raja and deputy center manager Sindbæk study the cities of the past and often have similar questions and challenges when it comes to the archaeological material. Therefore, based on research from the center, the two colleagues have joined forces to create a journal on the branch of archeology that deals with cities.  It is the first journal to focus on urban archeology from a global perspective.

The first volume of the Journal of Urban Archeology can be found here

You can read more about the new publication in a press release from UrbNet here

More information about the publication can be found on its website here

CEM’s research into cable bacteria included in a special edition of Science

Earlier this month, the journal Science published a special issue on mud and what this type of sediment can store on it from a research perspective. In the article “The Mud is Electric,” science journalist Elizabeth Pennisi interviewed Professor Lars Peter Nielsen, head of center at the DNRF’s Center for Electromicrobiology (CEM) at Aarhus University. The article presented an in-depth portrait of the researcher who helped to discover the whimsical cable bacteria in Aarhus Bay.

You can read the article about CEM’s research in Science here