New edition of the book “The Ice-Free Greenland” by head of center Bo Elberling from CENPERM

25. May 2021

The book “The Ice-Free Greenland” was published for the first time in 2016. In the book,  head of center and author Professor Bo Elberling, from the Center of Excellence CENPERM at the University of Copenhagen, takes the reader on a journey and tells the tale of the ice-free landscape in Greenland. But Greenland’s landscape can change quite a bit in just four years, which is why the new and revised edition has been published now. The new book adds the last four years of research, covering, among other things, topics about climate changes in Greenland.

Greenland. Photo: The University of Copenhagen.

A new and revised version of “The Ice-Free Greenland” by head of center Bo Elberling, from CENPERM at the University of Copenhagen, takes the reader on a journey and tells the tale of the ice-free landscape in Greenland and how bio- and geosciences have provided new knowledge about the interactions between climate and nature. The book was originally published in 2016, with an emphasis on the soil, microorganisms, and plants in Greenland. But a lot can change in just four years, which is why the new edition has been published with the latest research in the field, exploring, among other things, recent climate changes and how they affect Greenland.

 

New possibilities and challenges

The last four years have added new insight into climate changes, and it is exactly those kinds of topics that the updated version of “The Ice-Free Greenland” explores further. The book looks at the new possibilities as well as the challenges Greenland faces in fields such as the permafrost, plants’ contribution to the greenhouse gas budget, and the landscape’s stability.

 

The new edition also adds the last four years of research from CENPERM, which means that over 100 scientific articles were compiled into the book. The latest research has resulted in an additional 25 pages, with topics that include the preservation of the country’s cultural heritage, ice drillings, climate signals, and the emission of greenhouse gasses other than carbon dioxide.