Public events

The Danish Science Festival

The photo shows an electric plasma bowl.
The photo shows an electric plasma bowl. Photo: The Danish Science Festival

The DNRF’s Center for Autophagy, Recycling and Disease (CARD), among many others, participated in the Danish Science Festival 2018. At the festival, and as a part of the Danish Cancer Society’s initiative SCIENCE SLAM, senior scientist Elisabeth Corcelle-Termeau and group leader Tuula Kalunki from CARD gave two individual lectures: “Breast Wishes” and “Trash Talks.”

Watch the two lectures by Corcelle-Termeau and Kallunki here

The Culture Night

The picture shows some guests at the entrance of some of The Culture Nights many events.
The picture shows some guests at the entrance of some of The Culture Nights many events. Photo: Astrid Maria Rasmussen/Sattrup & Høst

The annual event The Culture Night, held in the biggest cities in Denmark, is one of the largest and most used platforms for researchers and scientists to engage the general public in the world of science. A number of the DNRF’s Centers of Excellence, such as SPOC, QDev, the Center for GeoGenetics, and SYM, have participated in the event.

Read more about this year’s Culture Night here

Fun With Physics

The picture displays one of Science Pavilion's own posters.
The picture displays one of Science Pavilion’s own posters. Photo: Science Pavilion

At the Roskilde Festival 2019, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Niels Bohr Institute will join forces to welcome visitors inside the Science Pavilion, where, among other participants, researchers from the DNRF’s Center of Excellence DISCOVERY will be part of several different workshops held for the many festivalgoers. For instance, people can engage in building a cloud chamber or creating a solar charger and, thus, be invited to see the world in a new way. It is hoped that the experience will encourage participants to question the community around them.

For more information about the Science Pavilion here

Almost Human

Here the picture of the poster for Almost Human is shown with a wax doll lying down.
Here the picture of the poster for Almost Human is shown with a wax doll lying down. Photo: Almost Human/CPH DOX

At this year’s Copenhagen film festival CPH:DOX, for one night, the iconic Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek was transformed into a cinema and opened its doors to the public for the premiere of the documentary “Almost Human.” In addition, people had the opportunity to meet the 10 researchers involved in the film, including head of center at the DNRF’s Center for Urban Networks (UrbNet), Aarhus University, Rubina Raja. After the premiere, the public was invited to engage in open conversations with the researchers about our relationship with technology and its challenges.

More information about Almost Human can be found here

Knowledge and Coffee

An image of the drawing of people in the 20th century running around distributing newspapers.
An image of the drawing of people in the 20th century running around distributing newspapers. Photo: Knowledge and Coffee.

In 2018, the Møntergården Museum in Odense joined forces with the Danish University Extension (Folkeuniversitetet) and launched a new concept called “Knowledge and Coffee,” where the public is invited to enjoy a cup of coffee while listening to lectures on different topics held by the museum’s historians, archeologists and conservators. Last year, Kirstine Haase, Ph.D. student at the DNRF’s UrbNet, Aarhus University, and archaeologist at the Odense City Museum, together with Jannie Amsgaard Ebsen, a conservator at the Odense City Museum, gave a lecture on animals from medieval towns.

Read more about Kirstine Haase’s lecture here

Wine & Science

The picture is from one of Wine & Science's posters picturing a skull and the remains of human bones.
The picture is from one of Wine & Science’s posters picturing a skull and the remains of human bones. Photo: Wine & Science

Wine & Science (Vin & Videnskab) was established in 2010 by the Natural History Museum of Denmark, where scientific lectures given by some of the world’s most prominent researchers are combined with a glass of wine. This year, Professor Dorthe Berntsen, who is head of center at the DNRF’s CON AMORE, Aarhus University, held a lecture on the brain and how we reminisce and understand ourselves.

Read more about Dorthe Berntsen’s lecture and Wine & Science in general here

Science and Cocktails

The picture shows one of Science and Cocktails' event posters.
The picture shows one of Science and Cocktails’ event posters. Photo: Science and Cocktails

Science and Cocktails, a non-profit initiative started in 2010 by physicist Jacome Armas and the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, brings science and entertainment closer together through a series of public lectures intertwined with artistic performances and cocktails. Several researchers with a connection to the DNRF have participated, including heads of center Barbara Ann Halkier, at DynaMO; Rubina Raja at UrbNet; Dorthe Berntsen at CON AMORE; and Peter Vuust and Professor Morten Kringelbach from MIB.

For more information about Science and Cocktails click here 

Dopamin Release, Music Against Drugs

The photo is the logo of Dopamine Release with an icon of sound frequencies onto a red background.
The photo is the logo of Dopamine Release with an icon of sound frequencies onto a red background. Photo: Dopamine Release, Music Against Drugs/Under the Influence of Music

In 2018, the campaign Music Against Drugs launched a podcast series during which host Ihan Haydar, drummer in the Danish music band L.I.G.A, invited Peter Vuust, head of center at the DNRF’s Center for Music in the Brain (MIB) at Aarhus University, to engage in conversations about how music affects our brains. Through 10 episodes Professor Vuust and Haydar analyze different kinds of music, and try to answer the question of why we dance and why songs get stuck in our heads.

Listen to the podcasts here

Sugar Theatre

The caption is taken from the event. A blurry picture of three people in the background and in front the following text: "Poems take a scientific approach but discoveries are different in poetry. New matter flows along the river bed of the world."
The caption is taken from the event. A blurry picture of three people in the background and in front the following text: “Poems take a scientific approach but discoveries are different in poetry. New matter flows along the river bed of the world.” Photo: Torben Eskerod, Sugar Theatre/University of Copenhagen

The Sugar Theatre is an exhibition held at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copnehagen. For the exhibition, artists have created four works on sugar in cooperation with researchers from the University of Copenhagen, including Hans Wandall, professor and co-director at the DNRF’s Copenhagen Center for Glycomics (CCG).  The Sugar Theatre runs in four acts, each tracing sugary threads in and out of bodies, materials, and voices, and scientific and artistic disciplines.

Learn more about the Sugar Theatre exhibition here 

The Moon, Louisiana

The image is a picture used for The Moon's event poster. A blue moon landscape and a person with an instrument observing and photographing the surroundings.
The image is a picture used for The Moon’s event poster. A blue moon landscape and a person with an instrument observing and photographing the surroundings. Photo: Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

As a part of the exhibition The Moon at the Louisiana Modern Museum of Art in Denmark, Professor Martin Bizzarro, from the DNRF’s Center for Star and Planet Formation (STARPLAN), University of Copenhagen, gave a lecture on the moon from a geological perspective. In his lecture, Professor Bizzarro outlined the latest research on the formation of the moon and the Earth and discussed how researchers gather information about the moon based on geological materials.

Learn more about The Moon and Bizzarro’s lecture here

Physics Film Festival

 The picture shows galactic darkness lit by an astronomical phenomenon shaped like a planet or black hole. Photo: PHYSICS FILM FESTIVAL/ThisIsOdense
The picture shows galactic darkness lit by an astronomical phenomenon shaped like a planet or black hole. Photo: PHYSICS FILM FESTIVAL/ThisIsOdense.

Researchers from the DNRF’s Center of Excellence CP3-Origins established a Physics Film Festival in 2017 at a local café in Odense, Denmark. At the café, people watched famous sci-fi movies and discussed physics with the researchers, who also participated in the festival.

For more information about the film festival from CP3-Origins click here 

MISP-talks: The New Horizon in Biomedicine

The picture shows the poster for the event MISP-talks with eight profile pictures of the speakers and reseachers partcipanting.
The picture shows the poster for the event MISP-talks with eight profile pictures of the speakers and reseachers partcipanting. Photo: MISP-talks: The New Horizon in Biomedicine

MISP talks are a series of talks whereby the public is invited to hear about precision medicine and the emerging new science frontiers and technologies, presented by leading international researchers and experts, including Professor Jens Lundgren from the DNRF’s Center of Excellence PERSIMUNE. The talks are part of the New Horizon in Biomedicine, organized in conjunction with the MISP Research Camp, a multidisciplinary workshop in biomedicine involving biologists, mathematicians, computer scientists, and physicians from around the world.

Read more about the MISP-talks here